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Posted on: April 25, 2022

Roseville Fire Ramps Up Emergency Services

Roseville Fire Ramps Up Emergency Services

All of the pieces are starting to come together for a first-in-the-state approach to advanced life support. This spring, the City of Roseville Fire Department began “phase three” of services that they can provide during critical and life-saving moments.

What is Advanced Life Support (ALS)?

Advanced Life Support, or ALS, is basically a set of tools that Roseville Fire paramedics have at their disposal—from medications to equipment. These new tools are expected to improve the outcomes of serious incidents with hopes to improve hospital outcomes. 

Currently, fire departments throughout the state rely on the advanced life support services of their hospital partners. While these services are very effective, Roseville Fire may be able to arrive at an emergency situation quicker than other emergency services. When every second matters, a quicker response could potentially save more lives. 

I want to save lives and improve the quality of care for our entire community. That is my biggest motivator,” says Chief Brosnahan. “With these new tools, we will be able to serve more people, more effectively.

Building The Toolkit for Life-Saving Support

In 2012, Chief Brosnahan began setting up the building blocks of the program. In 2018, a staffing plan was developed to create a more stable and consistent level of staffing. In late 2020, a committee including representatives from Allina, Regions Emergency Medical Services, and other firefighters co-created a plan to implement the Advanced Life Support program. 

Over the next several months, Roseville Fire will be purchasing medications and equipment, to include 12-lead ECG (heart) monitors. Next, Emergency Medical Technicians and paramedics will learn how to operate the equipment and get familiar with the medications. The department hopes to start the ALS First Response program in early Fall of 2022. 

It's very exciting,” says Roseville Firefighter and Paramedic Mike Wallace. “Our department is always doing exciting stuff. We're always trying new things and we love working with the community to reduce risks.” Roseville City Council approved the program at the February 26 City Council meeting. Wallace adds, “we’re fortunate to have leaders who encourage us to improve and expand our services to the community further.

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